• Jennifer Nilsson

Simple and Delicious Fermented Carrots

Updated: May 24

(This post may contain affiliate links. See my full disclosure here.)

This easy 3 ingredient recipe for fermented carrots is so simple and so delicious!

Fermented carrots are a great introduction to fermented foods. With basic ingredients and minimal effort, you’ll have a probiotic-rich snack or side-dish ready in just a few days!

fermented carrot sticks in a white bowl with fork

At any given time, you can find various jars of fermenting foods on counters and in corners of our home. Kefirs, krauts, sourdough, and yogurt are just a few of the cultured foods that we enjoy. But fermented carrots are a true staple here.

Chopped and added to salads, dipped into homemade ranch dressing, or eaten as a side-dish, fermented carrots are definitely one of our favorite foods. And with the ease of this recipe along with the inviting tangy taste, they just might become one of your favorite ferments, too!

A Few Quick Facts About the Benefits of Fermented Foods

  1. Fermented foods can act as a natural probiotic, fostering good gut health

  2. Eating fermented foods can help with digestion issues

  3. Consuming fermented foods can help boost immunity

  4. Adding fermented foods to your diet can help reduce inflammation

  5. along with many other benefits, fermented foods are just plain YUMMY! (source)

What is Lacto-Fermentation?

When a food is fermented, it is done through the lacto-fermentation process. The term “lacto-fermentation” is often misunderstood. The first part, “lacto,” does not necessarily refer to dairy, as some might think. While it’s true that many dairy products ARE fermented, this is not the sole reason for the term. Lacto-fermentation refers to the Lactobacillus bacteria which was first studied in milk ferments. Various strains of Lactobacillus are present on the surface of all plants, especially those growing close to the ground – like carrots! Lactobacillus bacteria have the ability to convert sugars into lactic acid. Lactic acid is a natural preservative that suppresses the growth of harmful bacteria. When foods are lacto-fermented, it also helps to increase the vitamin and enzymes of the food. This makes it easier for our bodies to readily absorb nutrients in these foods. Which in turn, creates all of those other great benefits listed above. (source) Now, that we’ve covered the science part – let’s ferment!

Quick and Easy Fermented Carrots

There are a ton of variations on the internet for fermenting foods. And many use expensive equipment and accessories. None of those are truly needed. Below are the simple supplies that I use that will get you started quickly and easily.

Some vegetables need only salt and their own juices to create a brine. Carrots do not readily give up their juices, or “weep.” Because of this, a saltwater brine is needed.

  1. 1 quart mason jar and 4 to 5 regular mouth pint jars

  2. regular mouth lids and rings

  3. measuring spoons

  4. a cutting board

  5. a sharp knife

Ingredients

  1. warm water

  2. 1 to 3 T of a good natural salt (a true sea salt, pink salt, or “real salt”)

  3. 2 to 3 lbs of carrots, cut into 4″ sticks (preferably organic, but regular carrots are OK, too)

The recipe that follows is for basic fermented carrots without added flavors. For fun variations, see the suggestion list at the bottom of this post.

The Recipe

Fill the quart jar with warm water, add salt and stir to dissolve. (Natural salts may leave behind minerals that can still be seen. This is normal and OK.)

If using organic carrots, scrub skins well and slice into 4″ sticks. (Peel skins from non-organic carrots before slicing). For this recipe, carrot sticks should come to just under or at the shoulder of the pint jar.

sliced carrots on a wooden cutting board

Place the carrot sticks in the jar, packing as tightly as possible. This eliminates the need for a weight to hold sticks below the brine. Tip: holding the jar at an angle helps the carrot sticks lay close together while filling the jar.

hand holding jar with carrot sticks
carrot sticks packed tightly inside of glass jar

Pour the the saltwater brine over the carrots, leaving a 1″ headspace. Cap tightly with a 1 piece lid or lid and ring.

3 jars of fermented carrot sticks on a countertop

Allow to sit at room temperature out of direct sunlight for 2 to 7 days. A cupboard shelf or countertop away from a window works well. The longer the carrots ferment, the more tangy they will taste. Be sure to “burp” the jars daily by opening the lid slightly to release excess pressure. Tip: place jars on a tray or in a container to catch any brine that may overflow when burping.

jar of fermenting carrot sticks sitting on a cupboard shelf

Once the carrots are finished, burp one last time, tighten the jar lid and move to the refrigerator. Fermented foods can keep well in the refrigerator from 4 to 12 months. Some cloudiness of the brine is perfectly normal. Always be sure to check for mold.

PLEASE TAKE NOTE: If fermented foods have not been a regular part of your diet, start slowly with only a couple carrot sticks once a day. Once fermented foods have been incorporated into your daily eating, aim for 2 to 3 servings of various fermented food each day.

Delicious variations of fermented carrots to try:

To each jar before filling with sliced carrots try adding one of the combinations below

  1. add 1 peeled and slightly crushed clove of garlic + a small sprig of fresh dill

  2. a pinch of red pepper flakes + 1 peeled crushed clove of garlic

  3. 2 to 3 slices of peeled fresh ginger

  4. several sweet red pepper strips added along with the sliced carrots

  5. a few fresh basil leaves and a squeeze of lemon


fermented carrot sticks in white bowl with fork


Quick and Easy Fermented Carrots

There are a ton of variations on the internet for fermenting foods. And many use expensive equipment and accessories. None of those are truly needed. Below are the simple supplies that I use that will get you started quickly and easily.

Prep Time15 mins

Culture Time4 d

Course: Side Dish

Cuisine: American

Keyword: Fermented Foods

Equipment


1 quart mason jar and 4 to 5 regular mouth pint jars


regular mouth lids and rings


measuring spoons


a cutting board


a sharp knife

Ingredients

  1. 1 quart warm water

  2. 1 to 3 T of a good natural salt a true sea salt, pink salt, or “real salt”

  3. 2 to 3 lbs of carrots cut into 4″ sticks (preferably organic, but regular carrots are OK, too)

Instructions


Fill the quart jar with warm water, add salt and stir to dissolve. (Natural salts may leave behind minerals that can still be seen. This is normal and OK.)


If using organic carrots, scrub skins well and slice into 4″ sticks. (Peel skins from non-organic carrots before slicing). For this recipe, carrot sticks should come to just under or at the shoulder of the pint jar.


Place the carrot sticks in the jar, packing as tightly as possible. This eliminates the need for a weight to hold sticks below the brine. Tip: holding the jar at an angle helps the carrot sticks lay close together while filling the jar.


Pour the the saltwater brine over the carrots, leaving a 1″ headspace. Cap tightly with a 1 piece lid or lid and ring.


Allow to sit at room temperature out of direct sunlight for 2 to 7 days. A cupboard shelf or countertop away from a window works well. The longer the carrots ferment, the more tangy they will taste. Be sure to “burp” the jars daily by opening the lid slightly to release excess pressure. Tip: place jars on a try or in a container to catch any brine that may overflow when burping.


Once the carrots are finished, burp on last time, tighten the jar lid and move to the refrigerator. Fermented foods can keep well in the refrigerator from 4 to 12 months.


Some cloudiness of the brine is perfectly normal. Always be sure to check for mold.

Notes

If fermented foods have not been a regular part of your diet, start slowly with only a couple carrot sticks once a day. Once fermented foods have been incorporated into your daily eating, aim for 2 to 3 servings of various fermented food each day.

Delicious variations of fermented carrots to try:To each jar before filling with sliced carrots try adding one of the combinations below

  1. add 1 peeled and slightly crushed clove of garlic + a small sprig of fresh dill

  2. a pinch of red pepper flakes + 1 peeled crushed clove of garlic

  3. 2 to 3 slices of peeled fresh ginger

  4. several sweet red pepper strips added along with the sliced carrots

  5. a few fresh basil leaves and a squeeze of lemon

Pin It For Later

quick and easy fermented carrot recipe #fermentedfoods #fermentedcarrots #wholefoodrecipe #healthy #carrots

#fermenting #recipes

Recent Posts

See All